The US job market is on fire. Here’s why it doesn’t feel that way

However, consumers feel undervalued as they struggle with rising prices on everything from patio furniture and gas groceries. Home prices have skyrocketed, but with the Federal Reserve raising interest rates, the floating rate mortgages they are getting more and more expensiveas well.

For the many American households already worried about their finances in the year ahead, the recovery is complicated.

There are no two ways to do it: the US job market is very strong right now.

The US added 431,000 jobs in March, pushing the unemployment rate to a new pandemic low
The nation is all about 1% away from recovering all the jobs lost during the Covid pandemic. Between January and March, the US economy added a whopping 1.7 million jobs. Aside from a hiccup in December 2020, when rising infections hurt job creation, US employers have added a large number of jobs each month since the recovery began in May 2020.

That’s remarkable and puts the nation on track to recover from the pandemic recession eight years earlier than it did after the Great Recession.

“We are experiencing the fastest labor market recovery in more than a generation, adding nearly 8 [million] jobs from [President Joe Biden] took office, comprising 93% of the jobs lost during the pandemic,” Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen wrote in a cheep Friday.

At the same time, wages have risen the most, rising 5.6% in the year to February. The high demand for workers means that companies have to pay more to attract and retain staff.

Data from the government’s Monthly Job Vacancies and Job Turnover Survey show that while Americans quit en masseare overwhelmingly advancing to new jobs for better wages or benefits.

Yet despite the millions of jobs available and rising wages, things don’t necessarily feel good for everyone.

The Bad: Inflation, Gas Prices, and Geopolitics

Americans had a lot to deal with in the first three months of 2022.

Coronavirus cases spiked earlier in the year as the highly infectious Omicron variant took hold, runaway inflation showed no signs of abating, prices at the pump for gasoline rose, and then Russia invaded Ukraine, sending the world economy into a tailspin. would go crazy

Although the wave of Omicron subsided, there is already a new variant to worry about. The other fear factors from early 2022, however, continue to cast their shadow. How does the second quarter start? This confluence of anxiety inducing factors obscures how well things really were going.

Inflation is at the highest level in 40 years, outpacing the steep wage increases necessitated by labor shortages.

How does inflation affect my standard of living?

Energy prices, which have risen steadily for the past 12 months, soared after the Russian invasion of Ukraine. Thus, a conflict on the other side of the world is tangible every time Americans refuel their cars. This especially affects lower-income workers., who drive more and are less likely to be able to work remotely.

Consumer confidence fell lowest level since August 2011 in March, when American families worry about what their finances will be like in the year ahead.
The contradiction is a dilemma that the Biden administration will need to address. in a Quinnipiac University Survey published Wednesday, 30% of Americans said they consider inflation to be the most urgent problem facing the country right now. Only 14% named the war in Ukraine. The same poll showed that only one in three Americans approve of Biden’s handling of the economy.
The Federal Reserve, which is independent of the White House, announced the end of its pandemic stimulus late last year. In March, it raised interest rates for the first time since 2018 in order to control the nation’s inflation problem.
But the central bank’s tools are blunt and need some time to take effect. For Americans with adjustable-rate mortgages, rising interest rates will become visible faster than for others, while inflation will only come down slowly, for example. However, it is the best the Fed can do. However, in terms of sentiment, increased rates will put another damper on optimism in the short term.

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